Narrative:

I was working del mar sector; aircraft X was IFR; inbound to okb on the GPS RWY24 approach; intending an IFR missed approach. Aircraft Y departed and began climbing for skydiving over okb. Based on aircraft Y's performance on previous days; I estimated that aircraft X would pass the airport before aircraft Y was ready to drop skydivers. I pointed out aircraft X to pacific sector; who works aircraft Y; and shipped aircraft X to the advisory frequency; which aircraft Y monitors; so the two would be able to communicate their intentions to each other. Aircraft Y climbed much faster than in days prior; and turned inbound to drop skydivers over the airport as aircraft X was also approaching the airport. Aircraft X checked back in with me not on the published missed approach; but 'offsetting for skydivers.' the result was an IFR aircraft executing other than the published missed approach; below the MVA. I asked aircraft X if he was VFR and he concurred. While I don't know if; on the advisory frequency; he offered to alter course for the skydivers; or if aircraft X just dropped anyway; either way it was an unsafe situation for an IFR aircraft to be in. The pilot should not have had to alter course; whether voluntarily or not; as he; on an IFR approach; is entitled to fly the published missed approach when necessary. The whole operation of aircraft Y skydiving should be closely reviewed; as it has an enormous impact on IFR traffic and is highly unsafe to VFR traffic as well. The area where aircraft Y drops skydivers is extremely busy and the altitude he drops from impacts four different sectors: he drops from 13;000 ft; on V458; which is right on the vista arrival into lax; where air carriers need to be descending out of 14;000 ft; affecting ZLA sector 12; and possibly sector 21 if the aircraft are stuck high too long; it affects pacific sector who works the jump aircraft and vista arrivals; it affects north sector who owns airspace in the area; and it greatly affects del mar sector who works all the traffic in and out of okb; nfg; and crq; all of whose IFR procedures are hindered by the skydiving. Aircraft Y skydiving should have to move their jump zone to a less congested area. If it does continue; del mar sector needs to work the aircraft as they have the most traffic underneath the zone; and we need to be able to instruct the pilot to 'hold jumpers' for IFR traffic.

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Original NASA ASRS Text

Title: SCT Controller reports of situation where an IFR aircraft offsets its missed approach for a skydiving activity.

Narrative: I was working Del Mar Sector; Aircraft X was IFR; inbound to OKB on the GPS RWY24 approach; intending an IFR missed approach. Aircraft Y departed and began climbing for skydiving over OKB. Based on Aircraft Y's performance on previous days; I estimated that Aircraft X would pass the airport before Aircraft Y was ready to drop skydivers. I pointed out Aircraft X to Pacific Sector; who works Aircraft Y; and shipped Aircraft X to the advisory frequency; which Aircraft Y monitors; so the two would be able to communicate their intentions to each other. Aircraft Y climbed much faster than in days prior; and turned inbound to drop skydivers over the airport as Aircraft X was also approaching the airport. Aircraft X checked back in with me not on the published missed approach; but 'offsetting for skydivers.' The result was an IFR aircraft executing other than the published missed approach; below the MVA. I asked Aircraft X if he was VFR and he concurred. While I don't know if; on the advisory frequency; he offered to alter course for the skydivers; or if Aircraft X just dropped anyway; either way it was an unsafe situation for an IFR aircraft to be in. The pilot should not have had to alter course; whether voluntarily or not; as he; on an IFR approach; is entitled to fly the published missed approach when necessary. The whole operation of Aircraft Y skydiving should be closely reviewed; as it has an enormous impact on IFR traffic and is highly unsafe to VFR traffic as well. The area where Aircraft Y drops skydivers is extremely busy and the altitude he drops from impacts four different sectors: he drops from 13;000 FT; on V458; which is right on the VISTA arrival into LAX; where air carriers need to be descending out of 14;000 FT; affecting ZLA Sector 12; and possibly Sector 21 if the aircraft are stuck high too long; it affects Pacific Sector who works the jump aircraft and VISTA arrivals; it affects North Sector who owns airspace in the area; and it greatly affects Del Mar Sector who works all the traffic in and out of OKB; NFG; and CRQ; all of whose IFR procedures are hindered by the skydiving. Aircraft Y skydiving should have to move their jump zone to a less congested area. If it does continue; Del Mar Sector needs to work the aircraft as they have the most traffic underneath the zone; and we need to be able to instruct the pilot to 'hold jumpers' for IFR traffic.

Data retrieved from NASA's ASRS site and automatically converted to unabbreviated mixed upper/lowercase text. This report is for informational purposes with no guarantee of accuracy. See NASA's ASRS site for official report.